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About Core Moto published wheel weights.
And published wheel weights in general.

Core Moto USA believes in transparency, therefore we are taking a different approach to our published wheel weights than that of the industry standard.
More about this below.

For the release of the Apex-6 in 2019 we are posting 2-3 different weight types in our wheel listings per application we offer. Some listings will show OEM weight comparisons.
As of 2-8-19 We are starting to update all listings... expect at least 6-8 weeks to complete most listings.

Bare Wheel weights: This means the weight of the wheel body used for the application without any components installed.
This weight is important to publish as it illustrates the main rotating mass of the wheel assembly separate from the components that are
closer to the center of rotation.

Fully assembled wheel weights: This means the complete weight of the entire wheel assembly with every component installed into the wheel body.
This is important because this is what you receive when you order a wheel set from Core Moto USA.

Component and hardware weight: Deduct the Bare weight from the complete weight to get component and hardware weights. This information will tell you how much of the entire
wheel mass is in the components close to center mass where gyroscopic force has less of a negative impact on performance.

No tricks: In general posted wheel weights for aftermarket forged wheels seem to vary widely depending on where they are posted. This can be due to a few factors we will list below.

Selective weighing of assemblies: Core Moto posted weights do not conveniently omit "ancillary" components to achieve a lower published weight. Posted aftermarket wheel weights often do not reflect the
entire wheel assembly. In some cases manufacturers or resellers weigh an assembled wheel, yet do not include components such as wheel spacers, valve stems, sprocket nuts or even entire cush drive assemblies to achieve a lower published weight. Sometimes bare wheel weights are posted as the final product weight. It is easy to justify..even tempting to consider these items as ancillary / extra components not to be be included in the published weight. Core Moto does not take that approach. Our assembled weights include every component in our finished product.

Selective model weights: Every motorcycle model fitment is different and such requires different hardware to make the final assembly fit the application. Therefore even if the same base wheel body is used, the weight of wheel assembly components vary greatly. Rather than using the weight of the lightest application for all model posted weights, Core Moto posts weights per actual model.

How does Core Moto collect model weight? As of 1-22-19 Core Moto Apex-6 wheels are in pre production, therefore we are relying on first articles produced for testing to collect weight for every model.
Every component in our assemblies, including pre production base wheels have been physically weighed. This data is applied to our computer assemblies for each model. Once Core Moto starts shipping new wheels in March, we will weigh every fully assembled wheel we ship out and update each listing if need be. So far our computer model weights have been fairly accurate +/- 1.5% for the computer model to actual weights we have compared. We attribute some of the 1.5% variable to Coating, plating and anodizing thicknesses across every component.

OEM Weights: Core Moto Collects weights of OEM wheels in a few different ways. 1: Ideally we weigh OEM wheels in house, however Core Moto never did this while doing R&D in the past... Proper fitment was in the form of dimensional data is always our primary concern over weight data. Moving forward, we weigh OEM wheels with the exact same components that Core Moto wheels come with to get a proper comparison. 2: We have partner OEM dealerships that we work with. We have provided these dealerships with digital scales, digital cameras and checklists to ensure that each wheel set is weighed accurately with photographic proof. 3: Online published weights until we collect weight in house or through a partner dealership. As stated earlier, published weights can be unreliable. Fort his reason, if we use any published weights for OEM weight comparison we make our best efforts to ensure that we find nearly identical weights from several sources often backed up by photographic evidence as well


Why weight matters:

About Unsprung weight:
Properly set up suspension allows the lower portions (swingarm, wheels and forks) to move rapidly with the bumps and dips in the road or track surface while keeping the main structure of the vehicle on a stable un interrupted path. In short reducing unsprung weight allows the suspension to work better by reducing the mass that needs to be controlled on compression and rebound, keeping the tire traction on the ground and the chassis stable.

About Rotational mass:
In nearly every case, much of the wheel mass differences between OEM wheels and Core Moto wheels lies in the outer rim section and the spokes, far from center. This is why the rotational mass aspect is so important, yet impossible to illustrate with entire wheel weight numbers. The more that weight is removed far from center, the higher the performance gains due to reduced gyroscopic and rotational inertial forces. Reducing rotational mass increases acceleration, decreases braking distances and improves handling. Lighter wheels decrease the amount of power needed to get the wheel turning. This also reduces the amount of braking power needed to slow the spinning wheel down. Rapid transitions from acceleration to deceleration benefit greatly from lighter wheels. Gyroscopic force is also reduced with lighter wheels, improving handling by reducing the amount of force needed to tilt the spinning wheel axis side to side. The reduction of gyroscopic and rotational inertial forces are compounded by higher speeds.